The feeling of watching the movie "The Last Samurai": a pious, spiritual belief that transcends life and death...

Antwon 2022-03-15 09:01:02

I just watched this film that was released in 2005 by the Americans and tells the story of the warriors fighting against the new army during the Meiji Restoration in Japan. After watching it, my heart could not be calm for a long time~ If it weren’t for the recognition of life and death in the category of Japanese traditional culture People who know the culture and the true spirit of Bushido cannot understand this movie. The protagonist of the movie is a heroic captain who participated in the American Civil War and won the US Congress Medal of Honor during the war. His name is Nathan O'Gren. After the war, Nathan was still unable to let go of the brutal and evil deeds of the unarmed Indian tribes he participated in during the war that he suffered from war stress response syndrome. He has been drinking and drinking and living a life until he was guided by his former boss. I saw a group of businessmen from Japan who came to the United States to find suitable new military instructors for the emperor... The story began, Nathan came to Japan and personally witnessed the last elite group of samurai and the new army during the Meiji Restoration of Japan. In the historical event of confrontation until its annihilation, Nathan's identity has also changed from a new Japanese army instructor to a member of the samurai group... Although the samurai is destroyed, the piousness that Nathan felt in the samurai group is beyond life and death. However, his spiritual beliefs made him find the sustenance in his uneasy heart, and obtained peace of mind! I won't say much about the specific plot. You can go and see this excellent movie for yourself. Now I want to talk about some of my thoughts about this movie: When Nathan came to the samurai village, he saw that everyone was so attentive to their work and life, and the farmers were waiting for the food crops. The women are preparing meals, the children are playing games together, the samurai are exercising their fighting skills in the field...He feels a special spiritual power here, that is, piety! Everyone is very pious and lives a serious life , He tried to understand this spiritual power. As an audience, I am also deeply fascinated by this pious attitude towards life. Living in a modern society where the spiritual world is becoming increasingly empty, I deeply yearn for this kind of mental state where I can concentrate on doing everything and experience it, and I will be at peace at all times~ △The tragic situation of the Great Hanshin Earthquake in Japan, the country’s geology is very special. Natural disasters occur frequently, and they must be prepared to face the life and death caused by earthquakes, tsunamis and various natural disasters all the time. The Japanese who have no resistance to life and death have learned to face life and death. Their indifferent attitude to life and death makes them unable to learn. Compassionate and compassionate in human nature, death in their eyes is beautiful and full of mysterious power. Warriors like to sacrifice their lives to this spiritual power by cutting their abdomen to prove their honor when they fail in war. And this is one of the most distinctive features of Bushido. Why is death in the eyes of the Japanese beautiful? In the movie, another protagonist samurai leader Masamoto mentioned this sentence when talking with Nathan: You are not afraid of death, and sometimes you even want to die... It is wrong to simply understand the spirit of Bushido that you are not afraid of death. The meaning of this sentence is Death in the eyes of the samurai is the best proof of their military honor. He is radiant and beautiful. When Katsumoto was dying, he saw the cherry blossoms in full bloom. You can understand that death in the eyes of the samurai can be as beautiful as the cherry blossoms in full bloom... I see During the movie, someone on the barrage criticized and questioned the sin and shame of advocating Japanese Bushido. I don’t think the traditional Bushido spirit of the Japanese is the same as the pseudo-Bushido that was distorted by militarism during World War II! I think it’s far more meaningful to understand other people’s culture and compare one’s own weaknesses and prevent them from happening in the future. I think that’s why this movie can get such a high demand in the mainland market. The main reason for rating and not being banned... The traditional Bushido spirit is the same thing as the pseudo Bushido that was distorted by militarism during World War II! I think it’s far more meaningful to understand other people’s culture and compare one’s own weaknesses and prevent them from happening in the future. I think that’s why this movie can get such a high demand in the mainland market. The main reason for rating and not being banned... The traditional Bushido spirit is the same thing as the pseudo Bushido that was distorted by militarism during World War II! I think it’s far more meaningful to understand other people’s culture and compare one’s own weaknesses and prevent them from happening in the future. I think that’s why this movie can get such a high demand in the mainland market. The main reason for rating and not being banned...

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The Last Samurai quotes

  • Algren: You want me to kill Jappos, I'll kill Jappos.

    Colonel Bagley: I'm not asking you to kill anybody.

    Algren: You want me to kill THE ENEMIES of Jappos, I'll kill THE ENEMIES of Jappos... Rebs, or Sioux, or Cheyenne... For 500 bucks a month I'll kill whoever you want. But keep one thing in mind: I'd happily kill you for free.

  • Algren: [Narrating] I have been hired to suppress the rebellion of yet another tribal leader. Apparently, this is the only job for which I am suited. I am beset by the ironies of my life.